by July 27, 2019
15 views
Join the California Army National Guard. Serve your country and community, around the world or around the corner. The National Guard has a dual missions, federal and state. Our federal missions calls us to support missions around the globe. Our state mission is to respond to natural and man made disasters here in California. To Join the California Army National Guard contact Staff Sergeant Brito at 562.900.0575 or visit http://www.iguardcalifornia.com Capt. Andrea Ourada wears a 9mm Beretta semi-automatic pistol in a shoulder holster, wryly decorated with a pink "Princess" sticker. She also has good jewelry. The latest piece is a delicately wrought Combat Action Badge. The silver sword-and-wreath was awarded for direct-fire involvement as a Blackhawk helicopter pilot. Ourada's unit, the Army's 2-147 Assault Helicopter Battalion, recently flew a combat-conditions mission unique in American history: The mission—involving two Blackhawks, each with two pilots and two door gunners—was carried out entirely by women, right down to the pre-mission crew flight briefings. "It was exciting," says Ourada, 29. "But it was also routine. We're pilots—no problem. There isn't any question about our abilities." In the course of the yearlong mission in Iraq, the personnel of the 2-147 will get to go home once, for 15 days. For Ourada, this means getting back to the farm where she grew up, near the tiny town of Lucan in southwest Minnesota. "We had a dairy farm," she says, "and every day, no matter what else was going on, you had to do the chores." Ourada is the oldest of five children and the only daughter. Growing up around a bunch of roughneck brothers, Ourada says, "I never felt incapable of protecting myself. If I've got to fight, I'll fight." That strength was tested when Ourada's brother Daniel was killed in a horrendous automobile accident six years ago. She was serving in the National Guard at the time and was considering becoming a pilot, but the tragedy—and its effect on her family—wrenched her life into painful focus. Ourada always had been driven to excel, but suddenly it seemed much more important to have clear goals. When she was accepted to flight school, she decided to attend. Two years later, Ourada says, "I was right at the top of the class. Then came the second anniversary of Daniel's death. I went into a slump. I was having a really hard time. If I hadn't come out of it, I don't know what would have happened. But then Mom called. She said the whole family was coming down for my graduation. I thought, 'Oh, my god, I can't let them down.'" She graduated with honors.
by July 27, 2019
12 views
The very first female pilot to fly the US Air Force F-35 fighter aircraft. The Lockheed Martin F-35 Lightning II is a family of single-seat, single-engine aircraft. EGLIN AIR FORCE BASE, Fla. - Lt. Col. Christine Mau, 33rd Fighter Wing Operations Group deputy commander, completed her first training flight in the single-seat fifth-generation fighter following 14 virtual training missions in the Full Mission Simulator at the F-35 Academic Training Center. “It wasn’t until I was taxiing to the runway that it really struck me that I was on my own in the jet,” said Mau, formerly an F-15E Strike Eagle pilot. “I had a chase aircraft, but there was no weapons system officer or instructor pilot sitting behind me, and no one in my ear like in simulators.” And with that, like the other 87 F-35A pilots trained over the last four years at Eglin, Mau thundered down the runway and was airborne as the first woman in the Air Force’s premier fighter. “It felt great to get airborne. The jet flies like a dream, and seeing the systems interact is impressive. Flying with the Helmet Mounted Display takes some adjusting, but it’s an easy adjustment,” said Mau. “The training missions in the simulator prepare you very well, so you’re ready for that flight.” The initial flight in the F-35 training syllabus is designed to orient pilots with the physical aspects of flying the F-35 compared to other fighters they’ve flown previously, such as the F-15E Strike Eagle, F-15C Eagle, F-16 Falcon, A-10 Warthog or F-22 Raptor. Women have served in combat aviation roles in those and other aircraft for more than 20 years. Mau acknowledged that although she may be the first female in the F-35 program, her gender has no bearing on her performance as a fighter pilot. Mau joked that the only difference between her and her fellow F-35 pilots is the size of her G-suit and facemask. They are both extra-small. “Flying is a great equalizer,” said Mau. “The plane doesn’t know or care about your gender as a pilot, nor do the ground troops who need your support. You just have to perform. That’s all anyone cares about when you’re up there – that you can do your job, and that you do it exceptionally well.” Mau’s combat experience and technical prowess in the cockpit were the primary draws for her selection to her position with the 33rd Operations Group. “Lt. Col. Mau brings a valuable level of combat and operational knowledge to our team,” said Col. Todd Canterbury, 33rd Fighter Wing commander. “We’re nearly a year out from declaring Initial Operational Capability with the F-35. We need battle-tested pilots to help us put the F-35A through its paces and ensure we have a trained and ready force of F-35 pilots to feed into our combat air forces.” Canterbury witnessed Mau’s leadership and combat effectiveness first-hand when they were both deployed to Afghanistan in 2011, where she was part of another important milestone for women in the combat aviation community. While with the 389th Expeditionary Fighter Squadron, Mau was part of the first all-female combat sortie. The combat mission provided air support to coalition and Afghan forces in the Kunar Valley, Afghanistan. From the pilots and weapons system officers of the two F-15E jets to the mission planners and maintainers, the entire mission was carried out entirely by women. “As a service, we need to attract the most innovative and skillful Airmen possible for one reason – it makes us more effective,” said Canterbury. “The broader the net that we cast into the talent pool, coupled with a laser focus on performance, ensures we have the best Airmen in place to carry out the mission. Performance is key, and it’s the standard we hold all of our Airmen to in the Air Force,” said Canterbury. Video Description Credit: 1st Lt. Hope Cronin Video Credits: Staff Sgt. Tarelle Walker, Airman 1st Class Heidi Goodsell, Master Sgt. Michael Jackson, Cpl. Owen Kimbrel, Lance Cpl. Casey Scarpulla, US Navy Ship USS Wasp and MC3 Theodore Quintana Thumbnail Credit: Kristi Mulder Modified by ArmedForcesUpdate
by July 27, 2019
7 views
Destroyer Squadron 15 ships USS McCambell, USS Curis Wilbur, USS John S. McCain, USS Lassen, USS Mustin and USS Shiloh participated in a range of exercises to improve proficiency in Anti-Surface, Anti-Air and Anti-Submarine warfare areas. AiirSource - A video and news hub for aviation/military enthusiasts. Favorite this video and subscribe to AiirSource for future updates. Subscribe to AiirSource: http://youtube.com/AiirSource Add AiirSource to your circles on Google+: http://google.com/+AiirSource Join the conversation on Facebook: http://facebook.com/AiirSource Follow AiirSource on Twitter: http://twitter.com/AiirSource Check out our photostream on Flickr: http://www.flickr.com/AiirSource Find us on the web: http://www.AiirSource.com Video by Petty Officer 2nd Class Adrian White | AFN Yokosuka
by July 27, 2019
16 views
Logistic convoys are some of the most targeted and deadly places in a combat zone. A convoy must be well armed and protected by trained personnel who know how to target and shoot back at the enemy. U.S. Marines with Combat Logistics Battalion 2, Marine Air Ground Task Force-8 (MAGTF-8) conduct Motorized Fire and Movement Exercises (MFME) during Integrated Training Exercise (ITX) 5-17 at Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center, Twentynine Palms, CA on July 23, 2017. Film Credits: U.S. Marine Corps Video by Sgt. Kassie L. McDole
by July 27, 2019
7 views
Wow! Urban close air support! Superb night vision of a Venom attack helicopter's tracer fire! (Please note, as always, that this video includes educational training events only.) U.S. Marine Corps UH-1Y Venoms assigned to Marine Aviation Weapons and Tactics Squadron One (MAWTS-1) engage targets during an urban close air support (UCAS) exercise as part of Weapons and Tactics Instructor Course (WTI) 2-17 at Yodaville, Yuma, Ariz., April 7, 2017. The UCAS exercise was designed to focus on specific employment of tactical air and rotary wing offensive air support aviation assets in order to support the ground combat element scheme of maneuver. WTI is a seven-week training event hosted by MAWTS-1 cadre, which emphasizes operational integration of the six functions of Marine Corps aviation in support of a Marine Air Ground Task Force and provides standardized advanced tactical training and certification of unit instructor qualifications to support Marine Aviation Training and Readiness and assists in developing and employing aviation weapons and tactics. Video credit: U.S. Marine Corps video by Sgt. Daniel D. Kujanpaa. Thanks for watching and God bless the Marines!
by July 27, 2019
9 views
Clip 1 Video by Cpl. Waiyan Tin Marine Corps Air Station Yuma Combat Camera U.S. Marine Corps AH-1W Super Cobras and U.S. Army A/MH-6X Mission Enhanced Little Birds assigned to Marine Aviation Weapons and Tactics Squadron One (MAWTS-1) conduct an offensive air support exercise during Weapons and Tactics Instructor Course (WTI) 2-16 at Yodaville, near Yuma, Ariz., March 31, 2016. WTI is a seven week event hosted by MAWTS-1. MAWTS-1 provides standardized tactical training and certification of unit instructor qualifications to support Marine aviation training and readiness and assists in developing and employing aviation weapons and tactics. Clip 2 Video by Lance Cpl. Christopher Thompson Marine Corps Air Station Yuma Combat Camera U.S. Marine Corps AH-1W Super Cobras and U.S. Army A/MH-6X Mission Enhanced Little Birds assigned to Marine Aviation Weapons and Tactics Squadron One (MAWTS-1) conduct an offensive air support exercise during Weapons and Tactics Instructor Course (WTI) 2-16 at Yodaville, near Yuma, Ariz., March 31, 2016. WTI is a seven week event hosted by MAWTS-1. MAWTS-1 provides standardized tactical training and certification of unit instructor qualifications to support Marine aviation training and readiness and assists in developing and employing aviation weapons and tactics. Clip 3 Video by Lance Cpl. Marcus Campbell Marine Corps Air Station Yuma Combat Camera U.S. Marine Corps UH-1Y Venoms with Lima Company, 3rd Battalion, 6th Marine Regiment, conduct an urban close air support exercise as part of Weapons and Tactics Instructor (WTI) Course 2-16 at Yodaville, near Yuma, Ariz., April 1, 2016. WTI is a seven week training event hosted by Marine Aviation Weapons and Tactics Squadron One (MAWTS-1) cadre. MAWTS-1 provides standardized advanced tactical training and certification of unit instructor qualifications to support Marine Aviation Training and Readiness and assists in developing and employing aviation weapons and tactics.
by July 27, 2019
16 views
Cockpit footage of U.S. Navy pilots as they takeoff and land aboard Aircraft Carriers and also a Landing Helicopter Dock (light carrier). Film Credits: Lt. Ian Schmidt Released by Lt. j.g. Michael Hatfield, Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Jared King, PO2 James Evans, WO Michael Kropiewnicki Derivative Works: Gung Ho Vids
by July 27, 2019
7 views
Watching the USS Carl Vinson (CVN 70) launch all of its fighters during "the final flight operations in direct support of Operation Inherent Resolve" is pretty freaking amazing. According to the Department of Defense, "the Carl Vinson Carrier Strike Group is deployed to the area supporting Operation Inherent Resolve, conducting maritime security operations, strike operations in Iraq and Syria as directed, and theater security cooperation efforts." DoD ideo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class James Bleyle. Read more: http://sploid.gizmodo.com/watch-a-us-navy-aircraft-carrier-launch-all-its-f-18s-1708721190
by July 27, 2019
7 views
Rapid launch of 20 B-52 Stratofortress Nuclear Bombers!! MINOT AIR FORCE BASE, N.D. -- Team Minot members participated in an annual exercise in support of the U.S. Strategic Command known as Global Thunder 17, Oct. 24 – 31. Global Thunder 17 is a command and control exercise designed to train Department of Defense forces and assess joint operational readiness across all mission areas. Since its inception in 2005, the USSTRATCOM exercise has provided realistic training for nuclear command, control and communication operations. The exercise included allied forces participation to help improve the ability to operate and integrate successfully. Global Thunder 17 focused on generating strategic deterrent forces, training sorties and tanker movements as well as the deployment of intelligence assets. “The 5th Bomb Wing's role in Global Thunder was to generate aircraft from normal day-to-day operations to nuclear capable alert status,” said Maj. Paul Goossen, 5th Bomb Wing Inspector General. “The bomber, and particularly the B-52, represents the most visible signaling platform in the U.S. nuclear force structure. So our role is really to provide flexibility to national decision-makers.” “Over 1,600 Airmen here at Minot were on alert status for the week-and-a-half long exercise working in our respective specialties… from crew chiefs conducting pre-flight checks, weapons loadmasters loading the aircraft, to munitions Airmen,” said Chief Master Sgt. Charles Miller, 5th Maintenance Squadron superintendent. Squadrons here devoted nearly 60 days of preparation to ensure the success of the exercise. “This is a visible demonstration to our allies and adversaries that we can deter and assure through the use of global strike, if necessary,” Miller said. Adm. Cecil D. Haney, USSTRATCOM commander, emphasized that the main goal for exercise GT17 was to set the conditions for strategic deterrence against a variety of threats to exercise all USSTRATCOM missions. “Testing our forces through a range of challenging scenarios validates the safety, security, effectiveness and readiness of the strategic deterrent we provide the nation,” Haney said. “U.S. Strategic Command forces are on watch 24 hours a day, seven days a week, providing the credible deterrent capable of convincing potential adversaries that they cannot escalate their way out of a failed conflict, restraint is a better option.” The exercise concluded with the 5th Bomb Wing successfully launching 20 B-52Hs. “For the 5th Bomb Wing, Global Thunder 17 was a huge success. Any time you can succeed so greatly in such a difficult test, it's a boost to both unit and personal morale,” Goossen said. “I think people are going to be talking about the 5th Bomb Wing's success in GT 17 for a long time.” Video Credits: Video by Airman 1st Class Izabella Sullivan Thumbnail Credits: Photo by Airman 1st Class Justin Armstrong Description: Airman 1st Class Jessica Weissman Video and Thumbnail Edited by Military Machines Youtube Like this video? Subscribe to support my channel! https://www.youtube.com/c/rotorvideos?sub_confirmation=1 Military Machines is not associated with the US government or US Department of Defense. "The appearance of U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) visual information does not imply or constitute DoD endorsement." Thanks for watching! Please check out my channel, comment, and subscribe!
by July 27, 2019
7 views
AH-64D Apache helicopters from the South Carolina National Guard depart McEntire Joint Training Base in massive formation for annual training. AiirSource Military covers events and missions from the United States Armed Forces: Army, Navy, Marine Corps, Air Force, and Coast Guard. Visit our channel for more military videos: http://www.youtube.com/AiirSource Like & share this video to show your support! Subscribe to stay updated: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=AiirSource Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/AiirSource Google+: http://www.google.com/+AiirSource Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/AiirSource Credits: Sgt. David Erskine, Sgy. Brad Mincey
by July 27, 2019
7 views
Travis AFB conducted a mass launch of 22 mobility aircraft Sept. 11, 2013, to practice the combat capability of large formation operations. The Freedom Launch also served as a remembrance of 9/11, as the first C-17 Globemaster III took off at 8:46 a.m., the same time American Airlines Flight 11crashed into the World Trade Center's North Tower on Sept. 11, 2001 60th Air Mobility Wing Public Affairs Tech. Sgt. John Ayre