by July 27, 2019
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The very first female pilot to fly the US Air Force F-35 fighter aircraft. The Lockheed Martin F-35 Lightning II is a family of single-seat, single-engine aircraft. EGLIN AIR FORCE BASE, Fla. - Lt. Col. Christine Mau, 33rd Fighter Wing Operations Group deputy commander, completed her first training flight in the single-seat fifth-generation fighter following 14 virtual training missions in the Full Mission Simulator at the F-35 Academic Training Center. “It wasn’t until I was taxiing to the runway that it really struck me that I was on my own in the jet,” said Mau, formerly an F-15E Strike Eagle pilot. “I had a chase aircraft, but there was no weapons system officer or instructor pilot sitting behind me, and no one in my ear like in simulators.” And with that, like the other 87 F-35A pilots trained over the last four years at Eglin, Mau thundered down the runway and was airborne as the first woman in the Air Force’s premier fighter. “It felt great to get airborne. The jet flies like a dream, and seeing the systems interact is impressive. Flying with the Helmet Mounted Display takes some adjusting, but it’s an easy adjustment,” said Mau. “The training missions in the simulator prepare you very well, so you’re ready for that flight.” The initial flight in the F-35 training syllabus is designed to orient pilots with the physical aspects of flying the F-35 compared to other fighters they’ve flown previously, such as the F-15E Strike Eagle, F-15C Eagle, F-16 Falcon, A-10 Warthog or F-22 Raptor. Women have served in combat aviation roles in those and other aircraft for more than 20 years. Mau acknowledged that although she may be the first female in the F-35 program, her gender has no bearing on her performance as a fighter pilot. Mau joked that the only difference between her and her fellow F-35 pilots is the size of her G-suit and facemask. They are both extra-small. “Flying is a great equalizer,” said Mau. “The plane doesn’t know or care about your gender as a pilot, nor do the ground troops who need your support. You just have to perform. That’s all anyone cares about when you’re up there – that you can do your job, and that you do it exceptionally well.” Mau’s combat experience and technical prowess in the cockpit were the primary draws for her selection to her position with the 33rd Operations Group. “Lt. Col. Mau brings a valuable level of combat and operational knowledge to our team,” said Col. Todd Canterbury, 33rd Fighter Wing commander. “We’re nearly a year out from declaring Initial Operational Capability with the F-35. We need battle-tested pilots to help us put the F-35A through its paces and ensure we have a trained and ready force of F-35 pilots to feed into our combat air forces.” Canterbury witnessed Mau’s leadership and combat effectiveness first-hand when they were both deployed to Afghanistan in 2011, where she was part of another important milestone for women in the combat aviation community. While with the 389th Expeditionary Fighter Squadron, Mau was part of the first all-female combat sortie. The combat mission provided air support to coalition and Afghan forces in the Kunar Valley, Afghanistan. From the pilots and weapons system officers of the two F-15E jets to the mission planners and maintainers, the entire mission was carried out entirely by women. “As a service, we need to attract the most innovative and skillful Airmen possible for one reason – it makes us more effective,” said Canterbury. “The broader the net that we cast into the talent pool, coupled with a laser focus on performance, ensures we have the best Airmen in place to carry out the mission. Performance is key, and it’s the standard we hold all of our Airmen to in the Air Force,” said Canterbury. Video Description Credit: 1st Lt. Hope Cronin Video Credits: Staff Sgt. Tarelle Walker, Airman 1st Class Heidi Goodsell, Master Sgt. Michael Jackson, Cpl. Owen Kimbrel, Lance Cpl. Casey Scarpulla, US Navy Ship USS Wasp and MC3 Theodore Quintana Thumbnail Credit: Kristi Mulder Modified by ArmedForcesUpdate
by July 27, 2019
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Rapid launch of 20 B-52 Stratofortress Nuclear Bombers!! MINOT AIR FORCE BASE, N.D. -- Team Minot members participated in an annual exercise in support of the U.S. Strategic Command known as Global Thunder 17, Oct. 24 – 31. Global Thunder 17 is a command and control exercise designed to train Department of Defense forces and assess joint operational readiness across all mission areas. Since its inception in 2005, the USSTRATCOM exercise has provided realistic training for nuclear command, control and communication operations. The exercise included allied forces participation to help improve the ability to operate and integrate successfully. Global Thunder 17 focused on generating strategic deterrent forces, training sorties and tanker movements as well as the deployment of intelligence assets. “The 5th Bomb Wing's role in Global Thunder was to generate aircraft from normal day-to-day operations to nuclear capable alert status,” said Maj. Paul Goossen, 5th Bomb Wing Inspector General. “The bomber, and particularly the B-52, represents the most visible signaling platform in the U.S. nuclear force structure. So our role is really to provide flexibility to national decision-makers.” “Over 1,600 Airmen here at Minot were on alert status for the week-and-a-half long exercise working in our respective specialties… from crew chiefs conducting pre-flight checks, weapons loadmasters loading the aircraft, to munitions Airmen,” said Chief Master Sgt. Charles Miller, 5th Maintenance Squadron superintendent. Squadrons here devoted nearly 60 days of preparation to ensure the success of the exercise. “This is a visible demonstration to our allies and adversaries that we can deter and assure through the use of global strike, if necessary,” Miller said. Adm. Cecil D. Haney, USSTRATCOM commander, emphasized that the main goal for exercise GT17 was to set the conditions for strategic deterrence against a variety of threats to exercise all USSTRATCOM missions. “Testing our forces through a range of challenging scenarios validates the safety, security, effectiveness and readiness of the strategic deterrent we provide the nation,” Haney said. “U.S. Strategic Command forces are on watch 24 hours a day, seven days a week, providing the credible deterrent capable of convincing potential adversaries that they cannot escalate their way out of a failed conflict, restraint is a better option.” The exercise concluded with the 5th Bomb Wing successfully launching 20 B-52Hs. “For the 5th Bomb Wing, Global Thunder 17 was a huge success. Any time you can succeed so greatly in such a difficult test, it's a boost to both unit and personal morale,” Goossen said. “I think people are going to be talking about the 5th Bomb Wing's success in GT 17 for a long time.” Video Credits: Video by Airman 1st Class Izabella Sullivan Thumbnail Credits: Photo by Airman 1st Class Justin Armstrong Description: Airman 1st Class Jessica Weissman Video and Thumbnail Edited by Military Machines Youtube Like this video? Subscribe to support my channel! https://www.youtube.com/c/rotorvideos?sub_confirmation=1 Military Machines is not associated with the US government or US Department of Defense. "The appearance of U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) visual information does not imply or constitute DoD endorsement." Thanks for watching! Please check out my channel, comment, and subscribe!
by July 27, 2019
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Travis AFB conducted a mass launch of 22 mobility aircraft Sept. 11, 2013, to practice the combat capability of large formation operations. The Freedom Launch also served as a remembrance of 9/11, as the first C-17 Globemaster III took off at 8:46 a.m., the same time American Airlines Flight 11crashed into the World Trade Center's North Tower on Sept. 11, 2001 60th Air Mobility Wing Public Affairs Tech. Sgt. John Ayre
by July 27, 2019
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The Boeing B-52 Stratofortress is an American long-range, subsonic, jet-powered strategic bomber. The B-52 was designed and built by Boeing, which has continued to provide support and upgrades. It has been operated by the United States Air Force (USAF) since the 1950s. The bomber is capable of carrying up to 70,000 pounds (32,000 kg) of weapons,nd has a typical combat range of more than 8,800 miles (14,080 km) without aerial refueling.Beginning with the successful contract bid in June 1946, the B-52 design evolved from a straight wing aircraft powered by six turboprop engines to the final prototype YB-52 with eight turbojet engines and swept wings. The B-52 took its maiden flight in April 1952. Built to carry nuclear weapons for Cold War-era deterrence missions, the B-52 Stratofortress replaced the Convair B-36. A veteran of several wars, the B-52 has dropped only conventional munitions in combat. The B-52's official name Stratofortress is rarely used; informally, the aircraft has become commonly referred to as the BUFF (Big Ugly Fat Fucker).The B-52 has been in active service with the USAF since 1955. As of December 2015, 58 were in active service with 18 in reserve.The bombers flew under the Strategic Air Command (SAC) until it was disestablished in 1992 and its aircraft absorbed into the Air Combat Command (ACC); in 2010 all B-52 Stratofortresses were transferred from the ACC to the newly created Air Force Global Strike Command (AFGSC). Superior performance at high subsonic speeds and relatively low operating costs have kept the B-52 in service despite the advent of later, more advanced aircraft, including the canceled Mach 3 B-70 Valkyrie, the variable-geometry B-1 Lancer, and the stealth B-2 Spirit. The B-52 completed sixty years of continuous service with its original operator in 2015. After being upgraded between 2013 and 2015, it is expected to serve into the 2050s
by July 27, 2019
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The U.S. military said on Tuesday that B-52 bombers will be part of additional forces being sent to the Middle East to counter what the Trump administration says are “clear indications” of threats from Iran to U.S. forces there. White House national security adviser John Bolton said on Sunday that the United States was deploying a carrier strike group and a bomber task force to the Middle East. Captain Bill Urban, a spokesman for U.S. Central Command, said that the bomber task force would consist of B-52 bombers. Read More :